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Self-Inflating Tires…Soon To Be A Reality?

March 31st, 2016

Driving around on underinflated tires is just a bad idea all the way around. Underinflated tires increase a car’s rolling resistance, meaning a drop in fuel efficiency since it takes more energy to move the vehicle down the road.

A single tire that’s down by ten pounds of air means a 3.3 percent drop in fuel economy…multiply that by all four tires, and you can figure on giving up ten percent of your gas mileage. The added friction and rolling resistance also means more heat is generated, and heat is the enemy of the internal structure of a tire. That heat will damage a tire to the point of failure. Studies show that underinflated tires are a full 25 percent more likely to fail, and at least half of one-car accidents involve a tire problem as a factor. And still, it’s estimated ...[more]

  Posted in: Tire 101

You Just Hit a Curb. Now What?

March 22nd, 2016

It’s not just novice drivers that hit a curb; it happens to even the most seasoned motorists. Upon hitting a curb, the hubcaps will likely get a few visible scratches. However, that may be the least of your worries. The tires can take some serious damage. Even if you hit a curb at a slow speed, you should take your car to an auto repair service for a precautionary inspection.

Potential Damage from Curbing Your Tires

...[more]

  Posted in: Company News, Auto Repair 101

Should New Tires Be Installed in the Front or Rear in a Front-Wheel-Drive Car?

March 22nd, 2016

Tires don’t wear out at an even rate. This is why most mechanics recommend a tire rotation at least once a year. Typically, the front tires wear out first due to them bearing the additional weight of the driver and front passenger. This is even more so in a front-wheel-drive car where the front tires receive power directly from the engine. However, when the front tires are replaced, should the front axles get the new tires, or should you move the rear tires to the front with the rear getting the new tires? This has long been a debate in many auto forums, especially when it comes to tire replacement in a front-wheel-drive car. ...[more]

  Posted in: Company News, Auto Repair 101

Save Gas With These Car Modifications

March 22nd, 2016

There are dozens of articles on the Web on how to improve fuel efficiency. By now, you’re probably familiar with keeping your tires inflated, not letting the car idle, and so on. However, you can also save gas with simple car modifications. Most of these changes involve the removal of nonessential parts, which can be completed by an auto repair service.

Auto Items to Remove for Better Gas Mileage

...[more]

  Posted in: Company News, Auto Repair 101

Why You Should Never Ride the Clutch

March 22nd, 2016

An estimated 4% of cars on US roads are stick shift. If you happen to be among the minority, then you might want to carefully examine the way you operate the vehicle. Most importantly, are you riding the clutch when you’re behind the wheel? Many manual car drivers ride the clutch without even realizing they’re doing it. If you happen to do this, then you’re causing premature wear to the clutch.

What Does It Mean to Ride the Clutch?

...[more]

  Posted in: Company News, Auto Repair 101

How to Check Tire Tread Wear the Right Way

March 22nd, 2016

You should check your tire tread at least once a month for safe driving. This seems like a fairly straightforward process: just examine the tread wear bars. If the bars indicate that the treads are worn, then it’s time for a tire replacement. It’s as simple as that, right? Well, not exactly so. There is a much more efficient way of checking the tires for tread wear.

Forget About the Tread Wear Bars

The problem with tire wear bars is that they present themselves at a depth of 2/32. This is fine for dryer climates like Phoenix or Las Vegas. Seattle, though, has a wetter climate. This means wetter roads, w ...[more]

  Posted in: Company News, Auto Repair 101

4 Things You Didn’t Know Could Damage Your Car

March 22nd, 2016

There are obvious things that can damage your car, such as extreme weather and lack of maintenance from an auto repair service. However, seemingly innocent and everyday elements can also deal a significant amount of car damage. Knowing what these are can help you better safeguard your vehicle against preventable wear and tear.

1. Leaves

According to the American Forest, ...[more]

  Posted in: Company News, Auto Repair 101

Insider Tips on Changing a Flat Tire

March 22nd, 2016

Yes, it seems a bit redundant writing an article on changing a flat tire. It’s not rocket science after all; just jack up the car, remove the flat, fit in the spare, and that’s all there is to it. However, even if you know how to remove a punctured tire, knowing how and actually doing it in a real-life scenario are two different things. While the statistics differ, some estimate that as many as 50% of drivers have never changed a flat tire.

Tire Change Troubleshooting Advice ...[more]

  Posted in: Company News, Auto Repair 101

Summer Tires Are not Just for Summer Commuting

March 22nd, 2016

Summer is in full swing. Does this mean, then, that you should transition to summer tires? Despite its name, summer tires aren’t designed specifically for driving under blazing hot temperatures. A tire sales and service company can determine whether your car will benefit by having the tires changed. In the meantime, it may help to learn more about how summer tires work and how they differ from conventional tires.

Summer Tires Explained

...[more]

  Posted in: Company News, Auto Repair 101

Do Emergency Tire Repair Kits Really Work?

March 22nd, 2016

Some motorists have one of those fix-a-flat products stashed in their trunk. After all, you never know when a tire blowout or flat will occur. Emergency tire repair kits provide a temporary fix and are far more convenient than swapping in the spare tire. However, how effective are these kits? Will they fully patch up a tire punctured by a wood splinter or glass shard?

How Do Emergency Tire Repair Kits Work?

These air compressor cans contain liquid and air that’s pumped into the tire. Once inside, the liquid solidifies into slime and seals the puncture. The temporary repair allows your tire to hold air long enough to drive home or to your nearest auto repair service...[more]

  Posted in: Company News, Auto Repair 101
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